What Can Politics Learn from Uber?

September 7, 2016

This post originally appeared in US News & World Report, here.

download (3)In the business world, if you don’t keep your customers happy, you’ll be out of a job. Consumers who love the product experience and the company behind it will buy more, be more loyal and will even be willing to use their social capital to spread the love. Businesses have done a great job lately of listening to consumers and innovating systems that can bridge the gap between customer satisfaction and corporate success. Politics has been much slower to respond to this new customer-driven, tech-focused economy – and would be wise to take notes from the business world.

First, let’s look at how businesses used to be. Industrial-age businesses were designed to produce their products better, faster and cheaper. They were hierarchical and often HIPPO-driven (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion). This worked because in a non-tech focused world, time horizons were much longer, competition was seldom global and workers had one kind of job year after year. The mission was to create consistent and predictable business outcomes through astute management. And it was feasible that a leader at the top could make definitive decisions for the whole company based on a tiny fraction of the knowledge available today.

Modern businesses are a different animal. They are tech-native, consumer-focused, globally connected and growth-oriented. Successful ones have shed the outmoded operating and leadership models of the last century and are experimenting with new ways to do business, lead people and interact with customers. They lure diverse talent using powerful missions and values and unleash that talent to tackle new challenges.

Our leaders in government and political institutions can learn a lot from modern business to adapt to the world’s changing landscape. So, what can politics do to respond to these demands?

For starters, harnessing social technology to connect with constituents on the real issues facing their lives is right in front of us. We can also embrace innovative solutions that break down the power structures that help old school leaders prevail, including the power of money and the power that parties play in who gets elected. What if politics tomorrow looked more like Uber? Uber creates an incentive for the two stakeholders – the passenger and the driver – to treat each other in a civilized manner. Both parties are accountable for their actions. If the driver is late or doesn’t drive safely, he gets one star instead of five. If the passenger is rude or abusive, her reviews are likewise downgraded. Dual accountability driven across a social business platform powers a system that is better for everyone.

But we have a long way to go before we can get the Uber experience in politics. Here are some standout attributes that the world of politics can adopt from modern business to create a better system for both voters and candidates:

Become Consumer-Focused. Use technology to access the customer voice, then use it to guide and refine outcomes. Social businesses connect buyers and suppliers and foster conversations from which insights can be gleaned and put to use in developing new paths forward.


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Susannah Wellford
founded two organizations to raise the political voice of young women: Running Start (which she now leads) and the Women Under Forty Political Action Committee. Susannah previously worked in the Clinton White House and for Senator Wyche Fowler. Ms. Wellford is a graduate of UVA School of Law and Davidson College. She lives in Washington, D.C. with her twins, Ben and James.

 

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Chris Baer leads Global Experience Design for Marriott International’s Learning and Development practice and has a background in brand marketing, operations and digital experience design. He holds a certification in coaching from Georgetown University’s Institute for Transformational Leadership and is a graduate of RISD. Chris is a contemporary artist in his free time.

 

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